Fansipan mountain in december

Guide to visit Sapa in december

If you are planning to visit Sapa in December, you must read this guide with some tips and reasons to show you what to do during this month during your visit to this stunning town located on the spectacular valley of the Hoang Lien Son Mountains in the North West region of Vietnam.

 

The weather

The best time to visit Sapa is from March to May and from September to November. At these times, the weather is relatively stable with sunny days and cool nights. The view of Sapa’s terraces is at its best between September and October, during the fall. The weather is more cold and misty the whole time but still wonderful views and certainly still green, than in other seasons of the year. The weather in Sapa it’s really special and hard to predict, mornings and afternoons are specially foggy and temperatures are colder. But no so cold as Vietnamese people are going to tell you. So, probably, you can enjoy a sunny day in Sapa in december. As you can see in the following pictures.

 

The daily average temperature for Sapa in December is approximately 10 °C.  However, it’s generally slightly warmer than the weather in some parts of Europe. As in November, it’s a great time to enjoy the outdoor activities that your are able to practice in the area like walking or cycling. Humidity for the town can reach 82% but due to the cooler temperatures, visitors shouldn’t expect any discomfort.

If you need more to know the weather with more precision, you can check the weather prediction for Sapa in December.

 

What to wear in Sapa in December?

Trekking it’s the main activity, don’t forget to pack all your equipment to be comfortable during this activity. You have available different kinds of trekkings, so you have to be prepared to achieve your goal. There you have a few tips:

  • Don’t forget your rain jacket. Weather changes a lot, so it would be required if you preffer to come back to your homestay dry. Also, if a rain jack it’s too hot to wear during your way, you can carry a cheap plastic raincoast (the cheapest option) or an umbrella. In adition, waterproof jackets are a good option to avoid the cold because it’s a way to stop the humidity.
  • Pack at least a fleece Jacket or/and a light sweater. Night time in sapa begins to get colder than normal, and it’s the best way to avoid a cold. If you are very sensitive to cold wear a warm sweater could be a good option.
  • Shoes with very good tread are a must, because trails can get very slick with mud after it rains.
  • Insect repellent.
  • During the day you could have a warm temperature, so wear T-shirts or shorts under long clothes it’s a good recommendation. Specially, if you choose a intensive trek.

Sapa trekking in December in Ta Van Village Local guide with umbrella

Tips to visit Sapa in December

Most of the people come to visit to admire the views of the rice fields, but after the haverst and with the new plant the views are also stunning. In December, they already had finished the haversting, and you can see the curvy terraces filled with water and that looks pretty amazing. All the rice are collected and waiting for the new season.

 

Fansipan Mountain

Probably you think that it’s not the best moment to hike to the top of the “Rooftop of Indochina”, but probably you are not right. In December, the weather it’s colder but that’s good when you are hiking. The views are going to continue being amazing, because you are above the clouds… A really amazing sensation! You are not going to feel warm and the same sensation of fatigue than in a warm day. If you have the choice, don’t hesitate to go to the top!

Fansipan mountain in december

Views from Fansipan in December

Visit Sapa Market

Located in the center of Sapa, Sapa Market is the convergence of goods exchanging among ethnic minorities in the region. Sapa is seemly situated in the center of villages in whole region at the foothills of Hoang Lien Son Mountain Range. This is also the junction of the roads from villages located in valleys to the north, namely Ta Giang Phinh, Ban Khoang to southern village such as Ban Ho, Suoi Thau, Ta Van, Lao Chai. In a large area, Sapa is an ideal convergence for trading activities and exchange of goods among ethnic minorities; simultaneously, it is also the perfect rendezvous in the unique cultural feature of the upland people.  Sapa Market is usually held on every Sunday. Those who live in the remote region often have to start their journey from the previous day to catch up with the fair. On Saturday night, many people early come to the market gather and cheer together with the folk songs of boys and girls in Hmong and Dao villages along with the sounds of lip lute, flute, panpipe… All seems much closer to each other though they have not ever seen before. They chat together under the flickering firelight. And, of course, you can try the most famous local food. You know that you are near the market when you begin to smell the barbeque food. In conclusion, Sapa Market is an opportunity to immerse in the idyllic life with this unique culture.

Sapa market traders

Sapa market fruit

Bac Ha traditional Market

If you enjoy walking around markets you should visit Bac Ha Market, one of the biggest and most well know in all of North Vietnam. Bac Ha Town is a three hour drive from Sapa and the market occurs every Sunday. Is not really the best place for shopping, but is a great location to visit if you are happy to people watch and take in the energy and vibrancy of the occasion. There, you could find many different ethnic groups such as Flower Hmong, Phu La, Black Dao, Tay and Nung minorities gather to buy and sell local products that cannot be found elsewhere. The best way to enjoy the market in all its glory is to arrive early and leave before the crowds of tourists arrive on the buses between 10am and 11am.

Bac Ha Market

Flower H’mong at Bac Ha Sunday Market

 

 

¿What are you going to in Sapa in December?

 

 

Can Cau market saturdays Sapa

Can Cau Market: plan for saturdays in Sapa

Can Cau is a busy market which is held every Saturday and is organized in business practices of Dao people. Located just 9 km south below the Chinese border, it is a colourful and vibrant market. You will find different minority peoples such as the Flower H’mong (Red H’mong), Nung, Phu La and even Chinese people from across the border. Their travel is often made by horseback as a way of carrying the heavy loads to and from market.

Can Cau market

How to go to Can Cau Market

It’s hard to find foreigners in Can Cau, compared than other places or markets in Sapa, because you have to spend a large journey to come there. either with a small tour group with a private driver or, you can find more adventurous people, who make the path on the back of a motorbike.

From Lao Cai province, along the national road 4D, visitors will come to Bao Thang district, Lao Cai province. It is far about 100km from the market to Lao Cai city to the northeast, so it’s a 2 hour drive. Down the 4D Highway from Lao Cai City, tourists will reach Phong Nien commune, Bao Thang district, Lao Cai province. Keeping driving along 153 Provincial Highway through Bac Ha town, tourists will set foot in Can Cau Market. If you want to go with public transport, the buses only run at 08:00 or 09:00, that likely means an overnight stay. The bus back from Can Cau to Bac Ha is at 14:00.

From Sapa, you have to spent a 3 hours drive. So you really have to wake up early and spend a lot of time in the road, so this option it’s not the most recommended. One good option, could be travel this market, make an overnigth in Bac Ha and visit Bac Ha Market on Sunday.

Through the town of Bac Ha, tourists will come to the Can Cau fair. From a distance, the fair of Can Cau is very beautiful and vivid. The fair has meeting along roadside 153-the only road connects the town with the town of Si Ma Cai. There have terraced fields around the market with the majestic mountains.
Can Cau Vietnam, Saturday Market
Can Cau Market, Northern Vietnam

Schedule and what you can find in Can Cau Market

As you would expect, the market starts early, around 7:30 am, and closes in the early afternoon so you will want to make an early start to get the most out of the experience.

By 9 am, the market is crammed to capacity. It’s lively and surprisingly fun. The locals are mostly of the Flower Hmong minority group. You can’t miss them and their traditional costume of green checked headdress and multi-colored, meticiculosly stitched and layered garments are simply stunning.

All kinds of goods are traded here, from fabrics to various types of livestock to the powerful local corn wine.

The market is divided into separate areas for all kinds of items. Those goods such as: vegetables, herbs, spices, utensils and other products, which shows the talent of women. However, the most striking is the area where sell livestock because the H’Mong and Giay love livestock and want to select the best cattle. The atmosphere in this area is very vibrant; buyers, sellers have the deal.

Besides, the area for the traditional food of people is quite exciting. Having a multitude of different sounds, visitors will have chance to sit down and enjoy the ethnic cuisine of them. Of all the dishes in Can Cau market, “thang co” will be the most favorite cuisine of ethnic. This dish is combined all kinds of organs of some animals such as: pigs, cows, buffalo…

Can Cau Market local people
Can Cau Market H'mong woman
can.cau market local sellers

Hoang A Tuong Palace front view

Hoang a Tuong Palace: a place for Hmong King

History of Hoàng A Tưởng Palace

Hoàng A Tưởng Palace (Hoang A Tuong Palace for us) was built in 1914 and completed in 1921. Hoàng Yến Chao was from the ethnic Tày group, he was the father of Hoàng A Tưởng. He decided to build this Palace for himself. Is a bizarre palace constructed in a kind of ‘oriental baroque’ style on the northern edge of Bac Ha. After nearly 100 years of existence, it is still standing between the majestic land known as the “White Highland” and the Sun.

These Tay ethnic minority men were reportedly regarded as “kings” of the Bac Ha region and ruled a region where 70% of the population were H’Mong people before 1945.

During his reign from 1905 – 1953, with the protection of France, Hoàng Yến Chao owned much of the fertile land in this area, and had the full right to exploit the surrounding forests and native products. He established a tax regime that required all of the people to pay tax on the products that they grew or made. He also had a monopoly on the sale of salt, drugs, food and other consumer goods, considered essential necessities in the region. During his long reign, he accumulated a huge amount of assets. Based on economic strength, in 1914 he decided to build this Palace to represent his wealth and power.
Hoang A Tuong Palace Bac Ha history
Entrance to the courtyard of the Hoang A Tuong palace

 

Hoang Yen Tchao family history

Hoang Yen Tchao had three wives and total of seven children, including two sons and five daughters. His first wife was of the Tay ethnic. She met Mr. TChao when he was just a regular civilian and they were married out of love for one another. She bore him three children, two sons and a daughter. The eldest son was Hoang A Tien and the second one was Hoang A Tuong. His second wife was the most miserable because she married him for his wealth and riches. She was only his second wife for a short time and then she got sick and died. She did not have any assets and nobody knew that she existed. She bore him two daughters and died while she was still very young.

Mr.TChao and his first wife

Mr.TChao and his first wife. Image from sapa-tourism.com

However, she didn’t die long before, Hoang yen TChao quickly took over as his third wife. She was of the Chinese descent. She went to Bac Ha to do business, with the sharp beauty of Chinese girls, her appearance caught the “eye” of the ” Hmong King”. She was a business woman and was very independent. She also had a successful business in which she was doing very well. She was married to Mr. Tchao for a short time and bore him two daughters. She did not like living in Mr. Tchao’s palace and so she moved to live outside of the palace. There she did business herself and did not rely on him for anything.

The third wife and her daughters. Image from sapa-tourism.com

Among Mr. Tchao’s children, Hoang A Tuong was revered as the most intelligent and was the dearest of Hoang Yen Tchao’s children. He was chosen as his father’s replacement to take over all the work. Mr Tchao was the “Hmong King ” but he didn’t name his palace after the eldest son, but his youngest son.

Leaving Bac Ha and the palace was short lived but the stories of their families still having lasting imprints on my mind. There is still so many mysteries around the palace.

 

Building Hoang A Tuong Palace

In order to prepare for the construction of this Palace, Hoàng Yến Chao had to plan very carefully. First he consulted with Chinese feng-shui experts to find the best location to build the Palace. The site was selected according to the Feng-shui theory of location. It was built on a large hill, facing south east, protected on both sides by mountains, the front has a spring and facing the mountain named “Mother is holding her baby”. Overall the topography in the area is beautiful, a charming “painting”, capturing the picturesque views and perfect Asian climate.

Hoang A Tuong had deliberately prepared materials for building the castle. Cement and steel were flown from the plains, while the bricks and tiles were manufactured on the spot with clay in the heart of the mountain range under the supervision of Chinese experts. The whole edifice was built of baked bricks and employed a binding agent with lime and beeswax. Workers were the best builders from prisons. Surrounding Hoang A Tuong Castle was the thick fence consisting of 3 gates (1 main gate and 2 auxiliary ones). Four side walls were crenellated fences and guarded by 2 platoons. In particular, behind the castle offered a solid and extremely secretive escaping tunnel.
Hoang a Tuong Palace tunnel stairs
The mansion was left uninhabited for many years as Hoang A Tuong had to live in exile in France after the region was liberated by revolutionary soldiers in the autumn of 1945. Nearly a century has gone by since its completion, the building remains intact and its Asian European-architecture still shines under sunshine.

The main two-storey mansion is surrounded by auxiliary houses on the left and the right, and has beautiful decorations on its façade and inside its rooms. Internal structure of the castle is fairly beautiful. Through the main entrance, a large yard inside is former home to organize main activities of the tribal mandarin’s family. Backcourt main building retains two floors with an area of 420m², which is often used for the meeting place of the family. Tourists setting foot in the castle have to walk up 17 stairs from both sides, then to the sheltered lounge. Additionally, the castle also has other construction items such as two auxiliary blocks on both sides. Each has two floors and is lower than the main building with an area of 300m². This is private space of Hoang Yen Chao’s wives and Hoang A Tuong’s wives. There are also two sub-blocks with simpler architecture used as accommodation for soldiers and servants.

The castle covers an area of 4,000m² in which the main building occupies 420m², Occupying a pivotal position overlooking the Bac Ha valley. In front of its arched doors are earthen banks. Its network of walls, bunkers, and battlements were reinforced by a mortar mixed with sugar molasses. In a distance, the white castle jutting out from the valley looks imposing and majestic. At present, this castle is put under a restoration scheme to better help tourists get insight into the changes of the local life.
Hoang A Tuong Castle in Sapa

Visiting this place you have an opportunity to learn about the live of a family of the ruling class and part of Bac Ha’s history in the past.

In adition to the palace, you can also visit Bac Ha traditional market.

Lao Chai Village

Lao Chai Village: discover Hmong culture

Lao Chai village, home to the black H’mong people, is located about 6 km from Sapa town. Just follow the main road for about 8 km, and then you’ll see a path down the valley to the right which will lead you to Lao Chai Village. The village is backed by high mountain ranges and situated near Muong Hoa river. Here you will enjoy the best panoramic view of rice terraces and streams and explore three large villages with over 100 families of the Black H’mong ethnic. Ethnic people in Vietnam are very hospitable and friendly. Going around this village, you will easily make friends and have chance to learn about local culture and customs.

Lao Chai almost lies in the middle of rice and corn terraces, so you also have a good chance to trace along with narrow but fabulous path on the fields to contemplate the whole zone of terraces. Best time to visit it’s from September to next April on which the village is so attractive with the most wonderful rice terraced fields.

Lao Chai Village
Lao Chai Village terrace padies after harvesting

How to go to Lao Chai Village

As you can see, Lao Chai is not too far from Sapa, so you can take a one day trail on your own. If you feel confident, of course.

There’s another good point to visit during this trip, Ta Phin Village.

You may go by car or motorbike to get to the villages but it shall be more stunning if you spend time trekking following the path along with the mountain side to go there. A trek is always the best recommendation to explore Sapa’s ethnic villages and their very culture and customs.

Lao Cai or Sapa and the Northwest of Vietnam in narrow sense often is developed it tourism industry with a form of community-based tourism, so then trekking to Lao Chai village learning about the local’s life and exploring the beauty of the very nature in the village are some of the most interesting and appreciated activities when coming to the upland town. By the way, it is very nice when from a high position on the main road, you can get great panorama of the whole village looming in high mountains along with the most beautiful river.

The trip must be very interesting when you mix with groups of H’Mong people on their ways to the village or to the terraces for work and though they intend to make some business, they do not force you to buy their products but chat with you friendly and share their experience and life. The children in villages love seeing the strangers coming to their homes, they are always happy for such small gifts. You do not forget to take some used comics or newspapers, magazines as gifts for them. However, absolutely do not give them money. It is a kind of unwritten rule.
Lao Chai, Mu Cang Chai, terrace padies
Children in Lao Chai road

Lao Chay Map

Lao Chai Village map

Lao Chai map by CBT Vietnam

 

Local ethnics in Lao Chai Village

 

The Giay

Only 2% of Sapa’s population comes from the Giay ethnic group, and so it can be tough to discover much about this fascinating community that immigrated to Vietnam from China only two centuries ago. A majority of Vietnam’s Giay group live in more northern provinces in the country where a stilted house (the traditional-style home) is common even now. In the sunny and fertile Lao Chai village, though, Giay homes have adapted to be closer to be only one story, usually with a simple interior in a dirt floor.
Distinct from the H’mong communities they live alongside, the Giay wear relatively simple clothing that boasts splashy, vibrant colours but less ornamentation than H’mong textiles. Thanks to their geographic roots, a whole host of Giay cultural elements feel distinctly Chinese, with the group’s clothing and cuisine borrowing flavours from Vietnam’s northern cousin. In Lao Chai, the Giay sustain their livelihoods and health in much the same way as the H’mong – by raising livestock and tending to endless rice terraces and mountain fields.

 

The Black H’mong

Making up a significant part of Sapa’s ethnic minority population, the H’mong community in Lao Chai is one of many scattered throughout the town’s verdant valleys. The Black H’mong are a distinct community within the larger H’mong ethnic group – so named after the deep indigo dye used in nearly all of their traditional clothing. Green, blue and purple is highlighted with splashes of red – and the Black H’mong’s uniquely vivid textiles have become a favourite element in souvenir shops and markets throughout all of Vietnam.

Black H’mong communities remain deeply traditional, with men and women often getting married as young as their mid-teens. It’s not unusual to meet a local H’mong villager of 25 that already has a handful of children. Instead, most families live off of the land and rely very little on income from selling textiles in local markets. Only when buying livestock or home goods will Black H’mong families need money. Most (if not all) of their food comes from their crops and animals.

The locals houses are built on the half side of the mountain to prevent from floods on the wet season. The H’mong here focus their cultivation in rice farming which is carried out on the lower land close to the bottom of the valley and sometimes they cultivate corn on the mountain slopes on terraces as the subsidiary food for life.

 

What to do in Lao Chai Village

With the form of community-based tourism, you will have a chance to experience handicraft manufacturing operations along with the travelling route, in which includes brocade weaving, traditional dyeing and more. Then you are highly recommended buying such products not only for their distinction and beauty but also the practical features with good benefits such as brocade scarves, embroidering cushions, especially ethnic instruments like “Khen”, “Dan moi” for beautiful souvenirs.
You can participate in the local’s routines by staying in their rudimental houses, communicating with such hospital and friendly ethics and mingling with their life which is definitely close with natural space and particularly enjoying their local dishes with exotic but yummy taste that always deserve at least a try. Thus, on your way to Lao Chai, you might receive simple but unforgettable experiences with preserved and precious traditional characteristics and customs of the local here and be obviously impressed with the ethnic’s hospitality and frankness despite the subsistence living.
Family in Lao Chai - Sapa
Black Hmong woman and baby, rice planting, Sapa Vietnam

 

Homestay with local Black Hmong Family

One of the best experiences when travelling to Sapa is a stay in the home of a local Black Hmong family. Thanks to CBT Vietnam training workshops many homes offer homestay experiences and authentic batik workshops. Within the network of trekking routes in the Sapa Region, Lao Chai does offer an excellent option to stay overnight and learn more about the Hmong culture.

You can find a list of homestays with local people.

Homestay with local family in Lao Chai

Cat Cat Village stunning views

Cat Cat Village: trek from Sapa&travel tips

:Cat Cat Village is a mountainous district of Lao Cai province, about 376 km from Hanoi. It is located in a beautiful valley about three kilometers from Sapa Town, at the bottom of the Muong Hoa Valley and near the stunning Cat Cat Waterfall. This is an age-old village of H’Mong ethnic group remaining unique customs and practices that are lots in other villages.

Cat Cat Village stunning views

How to go to Cat Cat Village

There’s nothing like a good hike to explore the surrounding villages, this is good because it is located only 3km south of Sapa. The hike to Cat Cat is downhill and easy on the legs. There are plenty of xe om (motorbike taxis) if you feel tired or lazy about finish the road. The trail offers beautiful views of terraced rice fields and you can see the village homes in the valley below. Along roads to the village, tourists can enjoy the ancient architectural beauty of small houses of local residents.

However, unless you’re with a tour or trekking guide, all the foreigners have to pay an entrance fee and you will need to buy them in advance and not at the door. The current price of the ticket is 70.000 VND. The Government set this tax in order to collect money to mantain the village. You will be disappointed if you arrive without a permit in hand. If you plan to hike this on your own, visit the Tourist Information Center near Sapa Square to pick one up first.
Road to Cat Cat Village from Sa Pa

History & Local People in Cat Cat Village

Cat Cat cultural village was formed in 19th century by the gathering of some families belonging to some ethnic groups living in mountainous areas of northern Vietnam, especially Black H’Mong. They lived next to each other along the mountain side and cultivated surrounding their home. Rice and corn are grown in terraced fields, while traditional handicrafts such as twisting flax and weaving fabric have been well-kept.

You will be impressed with the peacefully picturesque sceneries. You can see women sitting in front of the loom with colorful pieces of brocade, while children playing around with pets or even livestock. From the plain brocade, then women can carefully dye them with special leaves and embroider beautiful patterns of flower and animal on them. When these pieces of brocade are finished, they are dyed and embroidered with beautiful designs. A noteworthy is that H’mong women use plants and leaves to dye these brocade fabrics. And then they roll a round and smooth section of wood covered with wax on fabrics to polish them, making their colors durable.

In addition to the brocade weaving craft, many residents in Cat Cat are good at manipulating gold and silver jewelry. These are very sophistique products, especially jewelry for women.
Young hmong people in cat cat village
Cat Cat Village local H'mong people

Local architecture in Cat Cat Village

The original architect of H’Mong people is interesting as well. The houses of local people are divided into three rooms roofed with wood planks. Walls of these houses are often made from sawn timber. There are three columns standing in round or square stones inside houses. Each house will have three doors including a main door in the middle room and two others in the rest. The main door is always closed and only opened when big events such as weddings, funerals, Tet holidays happened. Besides, in each house, there are indispensable parts like kitchen, altar, places for keeping and food, etc. Houses in the villages are separated with each other by the terraced fields. At the rear of houses there are green and luxuriant bamboos. The most interesting thing that you can see when visiting Cat Cat village is rice mortars using water power from streams to pounding rice.
House in Cat Cat Village
Cat Cat Village Sa Pa Vietnam
Cat Cat Village local Hmong house

Traditions and festivals in Cat Cat Village

Some traditional festivals and customs of local people are often held annually such as Gau Tao festival and customs of “Pulling Wife”. Tourists visiting Cat Cat at the beginning of a year can participate in Gau Tao festival, which aims to bless for people in the village. This is the biggest festival of the village in one year. The festival is an epitome of spiritual and cultural life of H’Mong people. Another special customs of H’Mong is “Pulling Wife“. According to this customs, if a boy in the village falls in love with a girl, he will hold a party and invite his friends participating. He and his friends will make a plan bringing (“pulling”) the girl to his house. He will keep the girl three days at his house, and then if the girl agrees to marry him, they will hold an official wedding. On the other hand, if the girl refuses his proposal, they will drink “a bowl of wine” and just make friend with each other.

 

What to do in Cat Cat Village?

Cat Cat Village gives tourists a chance to have a glimpse into the daily life of local ethnic people, as well as take part in traditional activities such as weaving fabric. It is also a good opportunity to purchase some traditional souvenirs and handicrafts right from the craftsmen. You will find a lot of people trying to sell their products, specially children.

  • Take photos of the splendidly picturesque view of the hills and the terraced rice fields.
  • Look through the houses of the ethnic minorities in the village and discover how people in this area live. You will often see a big family so in one household: can live until 10 members more or less!
  • Visit the school. Currently, the government has made an effort to discourage villagers and tourists in giving of candies. So try not to give candies to kids.
  • Shop. As you go down the village you will walk past a lot of stalls with ladies selling handicrafts.
  • Drink the home-made apple wine. The price of a glass it’s 10,000 VND (50 cents).
  • Talk to the villagers and learn how Hmong say “Look”: “Loke” and “Make”: “Meki“. A little tip is when you don’t want to buy anything you just have say: “I’m only loke Ioke”.
  • Visit Cat Cat Waterfall. As you hike to the bottom of the Muong Hoa Valley you will see the stunning waterfall. There is actually a hydroelectric station, built by the French, that people in Sapa use to generate electricity.
  • Discover the Bamboo Dance. You can go into a small theater to watch the talented locals showcase their traditional dance.
  • Taste the local food to remember the experience.
  • Hike. Cat Cat is an easy and interesting route for trekking. The hike through mountains will offer you the wonderful picture of rice paddies, the waterfall or even water buffaloes grazing leisurely.
  • Nowadays, in order to develop the tourism potential of Cat Cat village, Lao Cai Department of Culture, Sport and Tourism has implemented many tourism programs. Such as Cat Cat Village’s Culture Days, One day becoming a Dao farmer or One day becoming a H’Mong bridge.
Cat Cat Village hydroelectric station

Hydroelectric station

Cat Cat Waterfall Sa Pa Vietnam

Cat Cat Waterfall

bridge Vietnam Sa Pa Cat Cat Village

Hydroelectric station Vietnam Sa Pa Cat Cat Village

Bridge Cat Cat Waterfall
With these activities, Cat Cat village is one of attractive Sapa places to explore folk culture of ethnic minority and immerse you yourself in unspoiled nature.

 

Coc Ly Market Sapa Vietnam

Coc Ly Market: live tradition in Sapa

Coc Ly Market is held on every Tuesday. Is a medium sized market that plays an extremely important role to ethnic minorities in the west of Bac Ha. Every Tuesday this is the place for meeting, goods exchanging and purchasing of the tribes from the surrounding villages. Goods sold in the market is the local products and utensils brought from the plains or imported from China. In addition, the market is a meeting place to display affection and feelings of ethnic minorities. Coc Ly Market, is more than a place where to exchange goods, is one of the few markets in Sapa still retaining its traditional cultural features.

Coc Ly Market Sapa Vietnam

About Coc Ly Market

Coc Ly Market starts around 7am and closes in the early afternoon. The market is divided into separate pavilions: an area for purchasing cattle, buffalo, horses, area for sale of fruit, living utensils and other area for food courts. If you visit this market, you will have a chance to witness the costume of ethnic groups and hear their own languages.

You also could find young Hmong boys and girls carry the baskets containing corn wine and flavors of the mountains such as black fungus, mushrooms, honey,etc. Meanwhile the old members of the tribe bring their buffaloes, cows, dogs, horses… to the market for sale. The widest and most exciting area is probably the place to sell cattle and poultry. From afar, althought there’s no dancing or singing, Coc Ly Market looks like a vivid picture with all of colors, ages from young children, teenagers to middle-aged people and the older.

Ethnic people gather there to buy and sell goods, dine and drink, or just wander to enjoy the ambience of the montagnard market.

You cannot ignore this place if you would like to find a full definition of a pure rural market.

Coc Ly Market in Sapa Vietnam
Local food in Coc Ly Market
Hmong selling buffalos at Coc Ly Market
Local Hmong people buying at Coc Ly Market
The Chickens Lady at Coc Ly Market

 

Ethnics at Coc Ly Market

You will find Flower Hmong (Red Hmong), Black Dao, Hoa (Chinese) Mong, Dao Den (Black Dao), Nung, Giay and Tay peoples in attendance and the goods on offer range from local fruit and vegetables to livestock, handicrafts and clothes.

Hmong girls are tremendously beautiful in colorful dresses and graceful with umbrella passing overhead. They usually concentrate at the bridge to show off their colorful dresses and more importantly to find their partners. This is also distinctive characteristic of Coc Ly Market compared to other markets of ethnic minorities in Sapa.
Shop owner at Coc Ly Market
Family in bike at Coc Ly Market
Girls at Coc Ly Market
Local Hmong people at Coc Ly Market

How to go to Coc Ly Market

From Sapa (90 km):

Theser are the itinerary indications:

  • Follow national road 70 traveling through the lush farm land of Lao Cai province for 42 km to Phong Nien Commune.
  • Turn left and follow provincial road 154 which sneaks through the country side along the Chay river for 17 km to Coc Ly. You can enjoy a beautiful scenery of high mountains, narrow valleys and terraced rice paddies. Enjoy several photo stops along the way, especially of the beautiful tear farms near Phong Hai.

 

From Lao Cai (60km):

From Bac Ha (35km):

It’s the best option because is about 35km from Bac Ha. You can get here via a fairly good road, or by road and river.

Tips to enjoy Coc Ly Market

  • Arrive in the market place at about 09.00am, at crowded time of the market.
  • Join local ethnic peoples to enjoy the exciting atmosphere as well as activities of this weekly market.
  • Walk from section to sections, corner to corners, seeing and smelling of different local product, spices, vegetable, farming tools, handicraft, even medicinal herb…
  • Meeting smiling peoples.
  • Remember to bargain when you want to buy your favorites.
  • The items at the booths located at the start of the path you walk on always have higher prices.
  • Keep walking toward the end of the traditionally ethnic market until you find a real bargain.
  • A good idea is to stroll every corner of the once-a-week bazaar as you listen to unexpected conversations, see nice surprises and learn how ethnic people sell and buy farm produce, life’s necessities and other things.
  • The market is always crowded for the whole morning and over after lunch time.

 

What to do after visit Coc Ly Market

After visiting the market, tyou can comfortably walk along Chay River to experience the tranquility of nature and the people here. The river becomes much more beautiful and poetic thanks to 2 majestic mountains. Both banks of the river are the beautiful sandbanks, villages of Tay, H’mong ethnic people, and wonderful waterfalls looking like flyaway white ribbon in the wind.

Leaving the market at noon, boarding a motor boat and cruising down stream the Chay River for 1.5 hour to Trung Do village of the Tay which is beautifully set on the bank of the river. Spend about an hour walking to explore this charming village before continuing the boat trip briefly to Bao Nhai.

Going to Coc Ly Market is to soak up colorful cultural beauty, experience the meeting place of the loving couples, ascertain the daily activities of the locals; at the same time you are immerse in charming and poetic natural scenery.
Chay River Boat rivet after Coc Ly Market
Bridge to Coc Ly markets
Horse transport to Coc Ly market

 

Not only is it the convergence of goods exchanging among ethnic minorities, Coc Ly Market now is also one of the impressive attractions in Sapa. You can go to the market in order to immerse in the romantic nature, discover unique features and feel to be one more of the locals. But take in mind that is 2 hours away from Sapa, so we recommend you to visit only if your time is not very limited.

Haversting season Y Linh Ho Village

Y Linh Ho Village: trail route from Sapa

Where is Y Linh Ho Village?

Map to show the way to Y Lin Ho village

Y Linh Ho village is located about 7 km southwest of Sapa town, on the west side of Muong Hoa River, on the way to Lao Chai village. Y Linh Ho is a small commune composed by a dozen of small hamlets scattering on the harsh mountain terrain with high and steep mountains.

The only way to get to the commune is the main road on mountain foot. The fresh air in the highland is really great for taking a walk. There are a few hundred inhabitants from the Black H’Mong living in this commune. They live in small houses made of house, bamboo and mainly cultivate corn and dry rice on the steep hillsides.

Y Linh Ho Village stunning views

 

Origin of the Y Linh Ho Village

The rumours said that the name “Y Linh Ho” referred from an old story of the Dao that it was originated from the name of the initial explorer of the land: “Ly Linh Ho” and then though the Dao moved on to other land and it became the Mong’s residence, it has been called “Y Linh Ho” as a kind of the ancient recall.

Black Hmong young girl

 

The road to Y Linh Ho Village

Distant from the main road, the path to the village is winding, tortuous and sloping. Y Linh Ho road is not noisy with crazy transport like in the center zone but being peaceful and quiet. The people here only depend on agricultural cultivation for living, mainly growing rice and corn, then terraces in the village are large and fascinating despite in summer when the green covering all the fields or in late autumn at which the terraces are all silky golden like an arty picture.

This is also one of the best places for best homestay in the nortf of Vietnam to explore the lifestyle and culture, customs of the resident.

Things to do in Y Lin Ho Village

Haversting season Y Linh Ho Village

  • Walk beside the river and valley and enjoy the fresh air.
  • Enjoy a picnic lunch beside the Muong Hoa River. If the weather is good you can go for a swim (it depends of you).
  • Continue the trekking route through the lush rice terraces to Lao Chai village.
  • You can move to Ta Van village to visit the Dzay minority and Ta van.
  • Interact with the Black H’mong people: it’s the best way to learn of their daily life and traditional culture, is an enriching and humbling experience.
  • Meet the Black Mong’s routines such as: weaving, dyeing with their unique method by using indigo.

 

A trekking trail to Y Linh Ho is a must on your trip to Sapa. You can enjoy with its rudimentary but beautiful houses, steep hillsides, the splendid rice terraces and the dreamy Muong Hoa Stream.

Tha Bac Waterfall – Silver Waterfall in Sapa